does everyone do the weights verbatim. doesn't seem enough

  • new here and read book years ago and wanted to start something different. I've been working out for years and have decent muscle size but would love to get peeled to the bones. just wondering did all these champions do the weight training like the book or did they do theyre own thing and just stuck with the diet. and cardio 20 min. 3 times a week didn't seem enough . but hope to here from someone that can school me otherwise because my joints hurt from all the years of heavy lifting

    do u count your post workout shake as 1 of your 6 meals

  • I think the exercises in the book are just suggestions. Basically, make sure you work each muscle group using whatever exercises you like. Be sure to keep it at a level that is challenging for you, and when you get to a point where a certain exercise feels easy, change to a different one. For cardio, there are a lot of people who do additional cardio. I know they don't recommended doing HIIT more than 3 times a week, but that doesn't mean you can't add some less intense steady-state cardio, such as on your free day (which is what I do). I'm no expert - this is just my take on it.

  • Bill did personal research on this subject.  To get in the total workouts in the time frame mentioned, by the book, and it does work, you only need to do 2 exercises per muscle group.  Your first exercise is done, in reps of 12, 10, 8, 6 with a drop set for 12 again, then pick another exercise for that muscle and do 12 reps.  Next time you do that muscle group switch your start exercise, so that you change it up a bit.  On my work days, I would do that by the book.  On my days off, cause I am bored at home, I would throw in more exercises per muscle group and do 3 sets of ea with 3 -  4 exercises doing 15, 12, 8 reps and maybe throw in a dropset here or there.  

    I hope some of this helps.

    Tis better to look UP in the mirror to be inspired than to look DOWN at the scale and lose your desire!! - SEM

  • I would recommend you do things by the book for your first challenge, which squid has outlined nicely, above.  I found the trick was the timing of when you decide to "push up", or increase your weight loadings for the next workout.  Following the regimen above, you'll find there are 60 reps for each muscle group, or 300 total reps for the upper body workout (UBWO), and 240 reps for the LBWO.  Your muscles should be pretty well exhausted after these workouts, i.e. work them to failure.

    After a few years of this approach, I changed my routines to do a core body workout, LBWO, and UBWO.  I outlined this in the "GYM" part of the forum with a post (which no one ever replied to, of course).  The core was abs, back, chest, and the biceps, triceps, shoulders in the UBWO, with hamstrings, quads, and calves in the LBWO.  I do six sets of 12 reps, each at the max I believe the muscle can handle.  Even if you have an off day, and only make 10 reps with this approach, it is one demanding workout.  Good Luck!

    Once I discovered the joys of weight training, all other passions were transcended.

    Jacium

  • i appreciate feedback thanks

    do u count your post workout shake as 1 of your 6 meals

  • Yes, absolutely.  The shake I drink has 300 calories and 42 g. protein.  I take a hanful of cashews or almonds with the shake.

    Once I discovered the joys of weight training, all other passions were transcended.

    Jacium